‘Piece Walk’ raises awareness for Oklahomans on autism spectrum

Scissortail Park was busy Saturday night as Autism Oklahoma hosted its Piece Walk to raise awareness.Hundreds of people gathered for the walk, and organizers said it was the largest autism awareness event in Oklahoma. “She woke up this morning with way too much energy, woke the whole house up, and I was like, OK, we’re doing it. Today is the day,” said Alicia Jackson, mother of the walk’s grand marshal. “We’re walking on behalf of Grace, but it’s for a much bigger cause.” Like many other parents whose children are on the spectrum, Jackson has gone through some extra effort.”Through the years, we’ve had to do a lot of different services, lots of therapies to get her to a really good place,” she said.Both inside and outside medical offices. “Just because you’re having to fill out a little more paperwork or paths with schools, things along those lines,” she said.But at the walk, there were booths that are made with sensory needs in mind. “For her, if she’s touching something it helps her focus a lot, so it means a lot if we’ve got sensory booths set up like the ones here today,” Jackson said.She wants other parents to know there are lots of families going through the same reality with their children. “I just want to let the parents out there know, especially those with a special needs child, that it’s OK, there’s a lot of us out here, there’s a great community out here, and a lot of support in Oklahoma,” she said .Organizers said before the event started that OKC had already raised more than $153,000 for autism support.

Scissortail Park was busy Saturday night as Autism Oklahoma hosted its Piece Walk to raise awareness.

Hundreds of people gathered for the walk, and organizers said it was the largest autism awareness event in Oklahoma.

“She woke up this morning with way too much energy, woke the whole house up, and I was like, OK, we’re doing it. Today is the day,” said Alicia Jackson, mother of the walk’s grand marshal. “We’re walking on behalf of Grace, but it’s for a much bigger cause.”

Like many other parents whose children are on the spectrum, Jackson has gone through some extra effort.

“Through the years, we’ve had to do a lot of different services, lots of therapies to get her to a really good place,” she said.

Both inside and outside medical offices.

“Just because you’re having to fill out a little more paperwork or paths with schools, things along those lines,” she said.

But at the walk, there were booths that are made with sensory needs in mind.

“For her, if she’s touching something it helps her focus a lot, so it means a lot if we’ve got sensory booths set up like the ones here today,” Jackson said.

She wants other parents to know there are lots of families going through the same reality with their children.

“I just want to let the parents out there know, especially those with a special needs child, that it’s OK, there’s a lot of us out here, there’s a great community out here, and a lot of
support in Oklahoma,” she said.

Organizers said before the event started that OKC had already raised more than $153,000 for autism support.

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